Cricket

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between 2 teams of 11 players on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 22-yard-long pitch with a wicket (a set of three wooden stumps) sited at each end.

One team, designated the batting team, attempts to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents field. Each phase of play is called an innings. After either ten batsmen have been dismissed or a fixed number of overs have been completed, the innings ends and the two teams then swap roles.

The winning team is the one that scores the most runs, including any extras gained, during their one or two innings.

Cricket clothing and equipment is regulated by the Laws of Cricket. Cricket clothing, known as cricket whites, or flannels, is slightly loose fitting so as not to restrict players' movements. Use of protective equipment, such as helmets, gloves and pads, is also regulated.

Equipment
Ball – A red, white or pink ball with a cork base, wrapped in twine covered with leather. The ball should have a circumference of 9.1 in (23 cms) unless it is a children's size.
Bat – A wooden bat is used. The wood used is from the Kashmir or English willow tree. The bat cannot be more than 38 inches (96.5 cm) long and 4.25 inches (10.8 cm) wide. Aluminium bats are not allowed. The bat has a long handle and one side has a smooth face.
Stumps – three upright wooden poles that, together with the bails, form the wicket.
Bails – two crosspieces made of wood, placed on top of the stumps.
Sight screen – A screen placed at the boundary known as the sight screen. This is aligned exactly parallel to the width of the pitch and behind both pairs of wickets.
Boundary – A rope demarcating the perimeter of the field known as the boundary.
Helmet (often with a visor), worn by batsmen and fielders close to the batsman on strike to protect their heads.
Leg pads, worn by the two batsmen and the wicket-keeper, used to protect the shin bone against impact from the ball. The wicket-keeping pads are slightly different from the batsmen's. Fielders that are fielding in close to the batsmen may wear shin guards (internal) as well.
Thigh guard, arm guards, chest guard, and elbow guards to protect the body of the batsmen.
Gloves for batsmen only, thickly padded above the fingers and on the thumb of the hand, to protect against impact from the ball as it is bowled
Wicket-keeper's gloves for the wicket-keeper. Usually includes webbing between the thumb and index fingers.
Safety glasses, for wicket-keepers, to prevent damage to the eyes from dislodged bails impacting between the grill and peak of the helmet.

 

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